From: Subject: Date: April 21, 2005 3:53:51 PM CDT Hankblog: Dignity...always dignity.

Sunday, April 17, 2005

Dignity...always dignity.

So Supreme Court Justice Scalia had a speaking appearance at NYU Law School last week. At this appearance, after Scalia had made comments demeaning what he termed "the homosexual agenda" he was asked by an NYU law student if he sodomizes his wife.

The student expressed the reasoning behind his question with the utmost dignity and eloquence at Wonkette's site today:

Fellow Classmates,

As the student who asked Justice Scalia about his sexual conduct, I am responding to your posts to explain why I believe I had a right to confront Justice Scalia in the manner I did Tuesday, why any gay or sympathetic person has that same right. It should be clear that I intended to be offensive, obnoxious, and inflammatory. There is a time to discuss and there are times when acts and opposition are necessary. Debate is useless when one participant denies the full dignity of the other. How am I to docilely engage a man who sarcastically rants about the "beauty of homosexual relationships" (at the Q&A) and believes that gay school teachers will try to convert children to a homosexual lifestyle (at oral argument for Lawrence)?

Although I my question was legally relevant, as I explain below, an independent motivation for my speech-act was to simply subject a homophobic government official to the same indignity to which he would subject millions of gay Americans. It was partially a naked act of resistance and a refusal to be silenced. I wanted to make him and everyone in the room aware of the dehumanizing effect of trivializing such an important relationship. Justice Scalia has no pity for the millions of gay Americans on whom sodomy laws and official homophobia have such an effect, so it is difficult to sympathize with his brief moment of "humiliation," as some have called it. The fact that I am a law student and Scalia is a Supreme Court Justice does not require me to circumscribe my justified opposition and outrage within the bounds of jurisprudential discourse.
Read the whole thing. Dude will be one hell of a lawyer some day.